How to put a letter in the letter

We have repeatedly written about   how to write your messages and letters   so that it is correct,   how to start   and   how to finish the letter   and today we will talk about how to contact a person if he is your doctor, director, older than you, or younger than you We have repeatedly written about how to write your messages and letters so that it is correct, how to start and how to finish the letter and today we will talk about how to contact a person if he is your doctor, director, older than you, or younger than you. Should the greeting look like “Dear John”, “Dear Dr. Fairfax ”,“ Mr. Gomez ”or“ Hi Tom ”?

Customs and expectations change, and depending on the circumstances, any of these greetings may be correct. Here are a few basic principles (with an American bias) that should be followed for addressing and greeting in letters and messages.

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Respect your addressees and choose an appeal that will demonstrate to your addressee that you respect and honor him. If you are writing to a person who is older or higher up, it is better to contact “Dear Mr. Peterson ”or“ Mr. Peterson. ”

Match the formality of the letter addressed to you. If you reply to an e-mail received from a person who is equal to you (that is, not a representative of the authorities), you can contact them in the same way as they addressed you. If you are contacted by “Hi Bob”, you can also write “Hi Jane”.

Try to contact so that your addressee does not feel old . According to etiquette, people who are older should use “Sir” and “Ma'am,” use “Mr.” or “Mrs.” and never call their elders by name. So what does this mean? If a person turns to “Sir,” will he feel old? Of course, Americans are less formal than other nationalities. In many other cultures, age is very revered, and if you are treated as an adult, it is considered honor and respect. But in America, if peers refer to each other “Mr.” or “Mrs.” this is overly formal.

Children like to be treated like adults, but it’s customary to address a child simply by name, and if “Mister John Adams” addressed him, it’s probably a joke or they are going to scold him.

Pay attention to the signature in the message. If the sender next to his name indicated what his rank or degree is, then he wants you to take note of this. Thus, if the sender has subscribed to “Thomas Nooser, MD,” this means that he reminds you that he is a doctor, therefore you should contact him in a reply letter “Dr. Nooser. ”If the signature reads“ Brig. Gen. Nelson Kraft USAF (Ret.), ”(I.e., retired general), contact him“ General Kraft. ”People spend years of hard work to earn these titles, so do not discard them. If you have the abbreviation PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) or LLD (Doctor of Law) before you, contact the addressee “Dr” (abbreviated from Doctor - Doctor). The initials DD mean “Doctor of Divinity” (Doctor of Theology), you can sometimes refer to such an addressee as “Rev.” (abbreviated from Reverend - Rev.) instead of “Dr”. Other military abbreviations are “Col.” (“Colonel” - Colonel), “Maj.” (“Major” - Major), and “Lt.” (“Lieutenant” - Lieutenant).

Address your addressees with respect, if you are sure that they will appreciate it. Today it is recommended to start all letters with the word “Dear”. This is especially suitable if you want to establish a warm relationship. In some business letters, for example, to strangers or to their opponents, the greeting “Dear” will sound improbable, because the addressee knows that the sender does not have “tender” feelings for him. On the other hand, by turning to someone “Dear” you can build or forge a good relationship, and sometimes even avoid conflicts.

On the other hand, by turning to someone “Dear” you can build or forge a good relationship, and sometimes even avoid conflicts